Rubraca® (rucaparib)

Different types of drugs are used to treat ovarian cancer, including targeted therapy drugs. Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets proteins in cancer cells that help the cancer grow, divide, and spread. Targeted therapy drugs identify these specific proteins and attack the cancer cells while trying to minimize damage to healthy cells.1

Rubraca® (rucaparib) is a targeted therapy drug that is used for treatment in ovarian cancer for:2-4

  • People with a specific BRCA mutation who have been treated with 2 or more previous chemotherapy treatments, or
  • Maintenance treatment of recurrent (came back after treatment) epithelial ovarian cancer in people who had a positive response to platinum-based chemotherapy

Rubraca is also used to treat other cancers. These include certain forms of prostate, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer.2,4

What are the ingredients in Rubraca?

The active ingredient in Rubraca is rucaparib camsylate.2-4

How does Rubraca work?

Rubraca is a targeted therapy drug that belongs to the drug class of PARP inhibitors. PARP (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase) proteins play an important part in the life of a cell. When DNA in cells is damaged, PARPs help fix the damage, allowing the cell to live.2-4

PARP inhibitor drugs like Rubraca make it hard for tumors to repair DNA that has been damaged. When the cancer cells cannot repair themselves, they die instead of growing and creating more cancer cells.2-4

What are the possible side effects of Rubraca?

The most common side effects of Rubraca in ovarian cancer treatment include:2-4

  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Low white blood cell and red blood cell (anemia) counts
  • Changes in how things taste
  • Stomach pain
  • Mouth sores
  • Diarrhea, constipation
  • Reduced appetite
  • Altered liver function tests
  • Upper respiratory infections
  • Rash
  • Shortness of breath

Less common side effects may include:2-4

  • Skin rash
  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness
  • Lowered platelet count

Some people taking Rubraca have reactions similar to an allergic reaction. Notify your healthcare team immediately if you experience any of the following signs:2-4

  • Fever or chills
  • Signs of an allergic reaction like rash, hives, peeling or blistered skin, wheezing, swelling of lips/tongue/throat

There are less common but very serious side effects that can occur with Rubraca. These include bone marrow problems, including myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Your doctor will do regular blood tests before and during treatment with Rubraca to monitor you for any bone marrow problems.2-4

More on this topic

These are not all the possible side effects of Rubraca. Talk to your doctor about what to expect or if you experience any changes that concern you during treatment with Rubraca.

Things to know about Rubraca

Rubraca can make you more sensitive to sunlight, so avoid spending time in the sun while taking this drug. Your skin may burn more easily, so wear clothes that provide ample coverage, as well as a hat and sunscreen, if you plan to be out in the sun.2-4

Rubraca can cause harm to an unborn baby and should not be given to women who are pregnant. Women who may become pregnant should use birth control (contraception) during treatment and for a period of time after the last dose of Rubraca. Talk to your doctor about the right birth control options and how long you need to use them. Women should not also breastfeed during treatment with Rubraca and for a period of time after the last dose. Talk to your doctor about the right breastfeeding options.2-4

Before beginning treatment with Rubraca, talk to your doctor about any other health issues you have. Also tell your doctor about any other drugs, vitamins, or supplements you are taking. This includes over-the-counter drugs.

For more information, read the full prescribing information of Rubraca (rucaparib).

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Written by: Jaime Rochelle Herndon | Last reviewed: May 2021